STRONGFIRST-SFB Bodyweight Course

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STRONGFIRST-SFB Bodyweight Course

My Review

Theodore Roosevelt said it best and StrongFirst put it right on their website:

Do what you can with what you have where you are.

Developed by world-renowned fitness guru Pavel Tsatsouline, the StrongFirst SFB Bodyweight courses teach how to get a powerlifting-quality workout anywhere, anytime, using one’s bodyweight as resistance.

The 4 exercises that are focused on are the One-Arm Pushup, the Tactical Pull-Up, the Pistol Squat, and the Hanging Leg Raise. And this class is no joke. Our class spent nearly 3 hours going over every single detail that dealt with the Pushup. From power breathing, to hand/arm placement, to the proper plank position, we learned and were tested over a whole list of tasks before even attempting the One-Arm Pushup (OAP). Modifications and practice material were given out, and after a short break, we went on to the Tactical Pull-Up.

Now it’s called the ‘Tactical’ Pull-Up because the thumbs are not wrapped around the bar. They stay on the same side as you other fingers in what is called a “thumb-less grip.” It makes sense seeing that individuals put in tactical situations (e.g. military personnel, police, and firemen) will usually be climbing over a wall or into a window, not a bar or a pole where they are able to wrap their thumb around. A strict Tactical Pull-Up causes you to contract your core and activates your Lats extremely well. So much so that significant strength levels are achieved with moderate use a couple times a week. And I come from a Marine Corps background where we were doing 50 pull-ups a day, 7 days a week!!

To step away from the upper body and give it a rest, we moved along to the Pistol Squat. The Pistol Squat is a bodyweight squat done on one leg to full depth, while the other leg is extended off the floor. Doing a proper Pistol takes a combination of strength, flexibility and balance. I had never in my life ever attempted a Pistol Squat until that moment, and the instructor was clearly able to see that I lacked the flexibility to fully complete the exercise. Myself and a few other class participants were given some pointers and then shown different versions of the modified Pistol Squat that we could do until we became strong and/or flexible enough to achieve the full Pistol Squat.

Last, but not least, was the Hanging Leg Raise. Starting off just like the Tactical Pull-Up, you then bring your legs up, folding your body and touching your toes to the bar. Simple description, but a difficult movement. Since it had the beginning of a Tactical Pull-Up in it, it was the quickest to go over, and for me, it was the easiest to grasp. As for some of the others, it was the hardest.

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Marcus Payton
TO Perform Co-Founder, Director of Kinetic Development
Marcus is about ensuring physical health and performance, and leads our Physical Fitness and Health & Wellness programs. A self-proclaimed adventurer and amateur athlete, his love for physical fitness began at an early age and continued throughout his college rugby days and his time spent in the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Army. It was during his time as an athlete and a warrior that Marcus began to understand the value of maintaining peak physical conditioning in extremely challenging and stressful environments. Since then he has dedicated himself to understanding the power and abilities of the human body, and strives to help others reach their full physical potential. Marcus has a B.S. in Kinesiology & Human Performance and was a Sports Director & Conditioning Coach in the Houston area before moving to Dallas to continue his passion in Strength & Conditioning. He enjoys running around outdoors, lifting heavy things, and visiting all the fine craft breweries that North Texas has to offer.
2015-10-21T09:47:15+00:00 October 7th, 2015|Body, Course, Fitness, Reviews|0 Comments